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Ghostface Killah Breaks Down Why New Rappers Should Study The Past

attends the new SHOWTIME Docuseries "Wu-Tang Clan: Of Mics & Men" celebration at Stella's Film Lounge during the 2019 Sundance Film Festival at Stella's Film Lounge on January 28, 2019 in Park City, Utah.

LEGENDS & ICONS OF HIP HOP - Article By Kevin Douglas

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attends the new SHOWTIME Docuseries “Wu-Tang Clan: Of Mics & Men” celebration at Stella’s Film Lounge during the 2019 Sundance Film Festival at Stella’s Film Lounge on January 28, 2019 in Park City, Utah.

The legendary hip hop star, Ghostface Killah, speaks on the new generation of rap and why newer rappers should study the past work of the greats.

The Wu-Tang Clan is one of the greatest rap groups to ever hit the world of hip hop. The unit consists of legendary artists such as Method Man, RZA, Raekwon and Ghostface Killah. The time period of their debut was amongst the arrival of iconic hip hop artists such as Nas, Biggie Smalls, Tupac Shakur, and more.

As time goes on the music of these men has reached epic proportions and are examples of what great hip hop records are. Usually the gap between the ages causes division between the generations. Sometimes old school artists can come off as bitter to the current rappers of the day, but Ghostface Killah takes a different approach in trying to reach out the youth.

In a new interview with Vulture, Ghostface opened up about one of his issues with rap’s “new generation,” a topic on which he often feels misunderstood. “I’m all for these young Black kids getting money and doing what they do,” he prefaces. “But musically, I think that becoming a rapper now, you should know the history. Know now who the Spoonie Gees and Sugarhill Gangs was, the Wu-Tangs and the Biggies, all that. Grand Puba, all these guys. You need to know these people. You gotta add to that. We got bodies of work. Mobb Deep, Nas, Wu-Tang, Jay-Z, we got bodies of work. These days, you might hear one record and don’t even care about the rest of the album.”

“Some of them really got talent,” he acknowledges. “You might not be able to understand that talent because that’s not the era you come from, but being an artist, you gotta be willing to listen to everything. It took me a while to start to understand these kids and their sound.”

The iconic rapper seems to be at a good place in terms of trying to find an even ground for hip hop’s different generations.

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